Video Shows Woman Ignored While Dying in New York Mental Hospital

Tuesday, July 01, 2008
Article from Associated Press as reported by FoxNews

After watching the video I was in disbelief that someone actually let this happen with no conscience at all.  I guess by now I shouldn’t be shocked by what people allow to happen when they could have helped but something like this makes me feel ashamed to think there are people that can ignore a situation like this………flagranny2

 

BROOKLYN, N.Y. —  Stunning video from a surveillance camera at a Brooklyn hospital shows a woman dying on the floor of a psychiatric emergency room while staffers ignore her.

The video was released by lawyers suing Kings County Hospital alleging neglect and abuse of mental health patients at the medical facility.

Click here to watch the video.

(when you click on this vide it will take you to the one or several ones taken from different views however the one that was originally posted that I first saw closer resembels the 3rd one down on the list at the right where she was completely ignored.) …flagranny2

The video shows the 49-year-old woman falling out of her chair at about 5:30 a.m. June 19, then lying face-down on the floor and thrashing around before going still. The woman died.

People nearby, including two security guards, do nothing to help. An hour passes before a fellow patient finally gets the attention of a staffer.

The tape also suggests that staff at the hospital might have faked medical charts belonging to the victim, Esmin Green, to cover her lack of treatment, the New York Daily News reported.

Her medical chart claims the Jamaica native got up to walk to the bathroom when she was actually writhing on the floor, the News reported. The records also have Green sitting quietly in her chair when she was already dead.

“Thank God for the videotape because no one would have believed this could have happened,” Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, told the Daily News.

The agency that runs the municipal hospital — the city’s Health and Hospitals Corp. — fired six staffers, including the two security guards.

Click here for more on this story from the New York Daily News.

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Child killer Mark Dean Schwab faces execution Tuesday

June 29, 2008
Sun-Sentinel
Sarah Lundy|Sentinel Staff Writer

Is lethal injection cruel and unjust punishment?  I personally can’t even consider that the criminal/murderer would think they would have that right, a right they never gave their victim.  After he lead them to the body his only comment was if he could get something from Burger King to eat and drink, That showed such remorse, NOT that hearing that remark made me sick………..flagranny2

Child killer Mark Dean Schwab — who kidnapped, raped and murdered 11-year-old Junny Rios-Martinez of Cocoa — is set to die Tuesday by lethal injection.

His execution marks Florida’s first state killing since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in April that the commonly used, three-drug lethal cocktail is not cruel and unusual punishment under the U.S. Constitution.

That ruling ended a de facto moratorium on the death penalty that had swept the nation while the high court focused on the issue.

Since the ruling, nine condemned men have been put to death across the country — far fewer than the “bloodbath” death-penalty opponents had feared would follow the decision.

Now, eyes shift to Florida on Tuesday, when Schwab, barring any last minute legal moves, will become the 10th man to die since the ruling.

“There is no question of his guilt, and the law says [lethal injection] is an appropriate punishment,” said Wayne Holmes, a Seminole-Brevard assistant state attorney and prosecutor on the initial Schwab case.

Junny’s parents, Vicki and Braulio “Junny” Rios-Martinez, could not be reached for comment.

For the past 16 years, Schwab has lived in a 6-by-9-foot cell in Florida State Prison in Starke. He joined death row in 1992 after he was convicted of killing Junny, a little boy who loved surfing and baseball.

On April 18, 1991, Schwab called the 11-year-old’s school and identified himself as the boy’s father. He left a message for Junny to go to a baseball field after school. Witnesses said they saw Junny get into a U-Haul with Schwab.

Five days later, Schwab led investigators to the boy’s body, which he hid inside a footlocker in a palmetto thicket in Canaveral Groves, north of Cocoa.

Schwab was originally scheduled to die by lethal injection Nov. 15. The U.S. Supreme Court issued a last-minute stay that postponed the execution while it considered the lethal-injection issue in a case that originated in Kentucky.

Some had hoped the top court’s decision would quash many of the legal challenges to lethal injection. But the closely watched ruling did little to settle the debate, and some say it has actually sparked more on the issue.

“It’s really started the ball rolling,” said Deborah Denno, a law professor at Fordham University and a death-penalty expert. The U.S. Supreme Court “hasn’t changed things that much, but there is a more heated discussion,” she said.

Some states — such as Georgia and Texas — are moving forward with executions this year. Texas has 16 scheduled to die before the end of the year.

Others — such as Ohio and Delaware — are examining the way they carry out capital punishment. Last month, a judge in Ohio became the first in the country to order authorities to stop using the three-drug cocktail and opt for a single, large dose of barbiturate, which is often used in animal euthanasia.

“This may have reverberations in other states,” said Ty Alper, associate director of the death penalty clinic at the University of California Berkeley school of law.

It doesn’t appear that Florida is headed toward the one-dose process yet.

Last year, Florida enacted new and detailed procedures for how to administer the three-drug cocktail after convicted-killer Angel Nieves Diaz needed a second dose of the fatal chemicals and took 34 minutes to die in 2006.

The state responded by requiring more staff training and better monitoring of proceedings in the death chamber.

Schwab will be the first condemned prisoner to enter the chamber since Diaz. There are no other executions scheduled in Florida. But there are 377 Florida prisoners waiting on death row.

Out of options
In 1992, Mark Dean Schwab was sentenced to death in the 1991 slaying of Junny Rios-Martinez, but the execution was delayed by appeals. On Nov. 14, Schwab’s execution was delayed until the U.S. Supreme Court decided whether lethal injection is constitutional. In April, the court ruled it is, and in May, Gov. Charlie Crist ordered that Schwab be executed.

Sarah Lundy can be reached at slundy@orlandosentinel.com or 407-420-6218.

Police: Man Confesses to Causing Death of Missing 7-Year-Old Utah Girl

Wednesday, April 02, 2008

SOUTH SALT LAKE, Utah —  A man confessed to causing the death of a missing 7-year-old girl who was found in the bathroom of an apartment in her family’s complex, police said.

Esar Met, 21, was being held Wednesday on charges of aggravated murder, kidnapping and evidence tampering. Police took five people into custody on suspicion of homicide Tuesday night.

Police on Tuesday night found the body of Hser Nay Moo, who disappeared Monday from the apartment complex after an argument with her 10-year-old brother.

Click here to read the probable cause statement (pdf).

Met admitted to authorities to confining Hser in the “residence by force, resulting in her death,” as well as to trying to conceal the body, according to the Salt Lake County jail document.

Police found Hser’s body in a South Parc apartment after obtaining a search warrant for three remaining units at the complex that had yet to be investigated, MyFOXUtah reported.

“Our hearts and our sympathies go out to the family,” South Salt Lake Police Chief Chris Snyder said at a press conference. “This has been a very tough case for all of us.”

Snyder called the discovery of Hser’s body a “tragic ending” to the case.

Cartoon Wah, Hser’s father, said through an interpreter that he was thankful to the public for their support.

“I have one daughter in this world, and I loved her the most,” Wah said.

Police took four suspects into custody on suspicion of homicide and later apprehended a fifth, Snyder said.

Hser’s body showed signs of “trauma” but authorities do not know how she died, and an autopsy will be performed, he said.

Click here for more coverage from MyFOXUtah.com.

US executions on hold awaiting Supreme Court ruling

by Fanny Carrier
Sun Oct 21, 4:46 PM ET 

I don’t know if it is me or what but I just don’t get how criminals on death row who have were proven guilty have the right to file a complaint that their executions by lethal injections are considered “cruel and unusual punishment”.  Do they not consider the reason they are there in the first place and the fact that they murdered someone and that their act of murder was considered not only “cruel and unusual” and that they murdered an innocent person for their own gains or in the process of saisfying their sexuality obsessions, etc.  Did they not take into consideration that taking someone’s life is also considered “cruel” to say the least.  Yet they have the nerve to say that they deserve a better and more civil execution procedure. 

What right did they give their victims? 

PhotoWASHINGTON (AFP) – A month after the US Supreme Court agreed to wade into the lethal injection debate, executions are effectively on hold across the nation as courts and politicians sit tight amid a legal limbo.

On September 25, the country’s highest court agreed to examine whether lethal injections — used in virtually all US executions — are “cruel and unusual” punishment, as banned under the US constitution.

Since it accepted to take up the case, all but one of the executions scheduled in the past four weeks around the country have been postponed, and only a handful are still due to take place before the end of the year.

“In effect we do have a moratorium. There is no determination by the US Supreme Court that no execution can happen. It’s more of a wait-and-see,” said Richard Dieter from the Death Penalty Information Center.

“This may not remove anybody from death row, it might just require some changes in lethal injection procedures and then executions might increase next year or so.”

Rights activists argue that lethal injections can be painful. During an execution, three drugs are administered to the condemned person: one to sedate him, one to paralyze him, and one to stop the heart.

However, this is not always done by a medical professional. While the prisoner may appear calm, several studies and botched executions have shown that death may in fact be prolonged and quite painful.

In Florida in December, Angel Nieves Diaz grimaced and shook for more than 30 minutes before finally suffering convulsions and dying.

Authorities later found that the needles were inserted too far and the lethal cocktail had been injected outside his veins.

In 2006, there were 53 executions in the United States, all but one through lethal injection.

Now though, executions appear to have been put on hold almost by default, apart from the controversial execution of Michael Richard in Texas, just hours after the Supreme Court’s decision.

This week the execution of a convicted murderer in Nevada was stayed at the 11th hour after an appeal by rights groups over the method of lethal injection to be used.

William Castillo had been due to be executed at 8:30 pm on Monday October 15 but was spared following a last-ditch legal bid by the American Civil Liberties Union to the Nevada Supreme Court.

In Virginia, Christopher Emmett won a reprieve late Wednesday just four hours before he was due to die for murdering a colleague.

The US Supreme Court ruled he could not be executed before his appeal had been considered by the federal Appeals Court. In fact, the federal court is unlikely to rule before the Supreme Court has delivered its own verdict on the constitutionality of lethal injections.

Amid such murky legal waters, the Supreme Court in Georgia on Thursday also postponed the scheduled execution of Jack Alderman, sentenced to death for murdering his wife in 1974.

And in other states the legal uncertainty has prompted governors and judges to stay all executions until the Supreme Court’s ruling.

But supporters of the death penalty say that this temporary suspension of the death penalty is likely to be short-lived, since the Supreme Court decision could lead to a resumption or even an acceleration of executions.

“The Supreme Court has never said that any form of execution was unconstitutional, and that includes firing squads and the electric chair,” said Michael Rushford, president of a victims’ defense group called the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation.

“This is a side-show, it has created delays in executions. The court will uphold, maybe they’ll make some suggestions in the decision about trained personnel doing the lethal injections.

“And the result will be that this tactic which has been used on and off for about at least 5 years to hold up executions will be gone, so in the future, once this method of execution is verified as not unconstitutional, there will be little to stop the states from going ahead and executing their worst murderers.”

Jury Finds Jose Padilla, 2 Co-Defendants, Guilty on Terrorism Support Charges

Thursday, August 16, 2007

MIAMI  — Jose Padilla was convicted of federal terrorism support charges Thursday after being held for 3 1/2 years as an enemy combatant in a case that came to symbolize the Bush administration’s campaign to stop homegrown terror.

He was once accused of being part of an Al Qaeda plot to detonate a radioactive “dirty bomb” in the U.S., but those allegations were not part of his trial.

Padilla and co-defendants Adham Amin Hassoun and Kifah Wael Jayyousi face life in prison because they were convicted of conspiracy to murder, kidnap and maim people overseas. All three were also convicted of two terrorism material support counts that carry potential 15-year sentences each.

The judge set a Dec. 5 sentencing date for all three defendants.

Click here to read the indictment (FindLaw pdf). 

Estela Lebron, Padilla’s mother, said she felt “a little bit sad” at the verdict but expected her son’s lawyers would appeal.

“I don’t know how they found Jose guilty. There was no evidence he was speaking in code,” she said, referring to FBI wiretap intercepts in which Padilla was overheard talking to Hassoun.

The three were accused of being part of a North American support cell that provided supplies, money and recruits to groups of Islamic extremists. The defense contended they were trying to help persecuted Muslims in war zones with relief and humanitarian aid.

[The key piece of physical evidence was a five-page form Padilla supposedly filled out in July 2000 to attend an Al Qaeda training camp in Afghanistan, which would link the other two defendants as well to Usama bin Laden’s terrorist organization.

The form, recovered by the CIA in 2001 in Afghanistan, contains seven of Padilla’s fingerprints and several other personal identifiers, such as his birthdate and his ability to speak Spanish, English and Arabic.]

Padilla’s lawyers insisted the form was far from conclusive and denied that he was a “star recruit,” as prosecutors claimed, of the North American support cell intending to become a terrorist. Padilla’s attorneys said he traveled to Egypt in September 1998 to learn Islam more deeply and become fluent in Arabic.

“His intent was to study, not to murder,” said Padilla attorney Michael Caruso.  [Full Story]     

Alleged Child Rapist Goes Free Because Court Can’t Find Interpreter

Md. Judge Dismisses Sex-Abuse Charges

By Ernesto Londoño
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, July 22, 2007

This is without a doubt one of the worst, if not THE worst case, that shows the quality or “lack of” in our judicial system to allow something as horrible as this to occur.  Not only did it allow this to occur but in my mind this may very well have set a precedent for anyone where English is not their native language. 

Washington Post – Full story 

A 7-year-old girl said she had been raped and repeatedly molested over the course of a year. Police in Montgomery County, acting on information from a relative, soon arrested a Liberian immigrant living in Gaithersburg. They marshaled witnesses and DNA evidence to prepare for trial.

What was missing — for much of the nearly three years that followed — was an interpreter fluent in the suspect’s native language. A judge recently dropped the charges, not because she found that Mahamu Kanneh had been wrongly accused but because repeated delays in the case had, in her view, violated his right to a speedy trial.

“This is one of the most difficult decisions I’ve had to make in a long time,” Katherine D. Savage said from the bench Tuesday, noting that she was mindful of “the gravity of this case and the community’s concern about offenses of this type.”

Loretta E. Knight, the Circuit Court clerk responsible for finding interpreters, said her office searched exhaustively for a speaker of Vai, a tribal language spoken in West Africa.

[Kanneh was granted asylum in the United States, according to State’s Attorney John McCarthy. A conviction could have led to deportation proceedings.]

[Kanneh was arrested in August 2004 after witnesses told police that he raped and repeatedly sexually molested the girl, a relative.

In a charging document, Detective Omar Hasan wrote that the girl “attempted to physically stop the behavior from the defendant, but was unsuccessful.” Hasan wrote that Kanneh threatened the young girl “with not being able to leave the apartment unless she engaged in sexual behavior with the defendant.”]                                                                                                          

Wanted Sex Offender, Mark Petersimes, Caught in Denver

Sunday, July 08, 2007

I can’t begin to count the number of articles I’ve read where criminals have cut off their GPS tracking ankle bracelet and are right back doing whatever it was that earned them the ankle jewerly to being with.  

You would think with all that is available today and so many skilled techies out there that someone couldn’t come up with a device that once it is locked around the ankle there would be no way to cut it off.   I just don’t understand how we can send someone into space yet we can’t make an ankle bracelet that stays on a criminal. – flagranny2

Just two hours before America’s Most Wanted was to air a profile on Mark Petersimes, the sex offender wanted by authorities was caught in Denver.

Petersimes, 47, was arrested Saturday night when an 11-year-old girl went into a Family Dollar store in Lakewood and told a clerk a man had attempted to rape her, according to MyFoxColorado.com.

Click here to see his profile page on America’s Most Wanted.

The clerk confronted Petersimes about the allegation and called police. He attempted to escape, but cops caught up to him and arrested him.

Petersimes had been on the run for more than a year after he escaped from a halfway house in Dallas. He cut off his GPS tracking ankle bracelet and disappeared on May 2, 2006, according to America’s Most Wanted.

His rap sheet extends back to 1981, when he was convicted of attempted rape in North Carolina and served two years.

Most recently, Petersimes was convicted in 1991 of sexually assaulting two young girls and served 12 years. In 2003, after release, he was put in a halfway house. He escaped, and had to serve more jail time. He was then put in another halfway house, but escaped again this past May.

He is being held in a Jefferson county jail on $1 million bond.