Harry Truman’s daughter, Margaret Truman Daniel, dies in Chicago

By Trevor Jensen | Tribune reporter
12:35 PM CST, January 29, 2008

Margaret Truman Daniel, 83, President Harry Truman’s only child, a mystery novelist whose early efforts as a singer famously led her father to threaten an unkind critic with a punch to the nose, died on Tuesday in Chicago after a brief illness, according to a spokesman for the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum.

After living for 41 years on Park Avenue in New York, Mrs. Daniel had made plans last May to move to Chicago. Her son, Clifton Truman Daniel, is director of public relations for Truman College in Chicago. But ill health and a hospitalization in New York delayed those plans. Mrs. Daniel was staying in a care facility in Chicago at the time of her death, the Truman library spokesman said.Mrs. Daniel was born on Feb. 17, 1924, in Independence, Mo. She graduated from George Washington University and pursued a singing career while her father was in office. She performed at Carnegie Hall in 1949.In 1950, a Washington critic panned one of her performances, prompting the president to write a letter on White House stationery that read in part: “Some day I hope to meet you. When that happens you’ll need a new nose, a lot of beefsteak for black eyes, and perhaps a supporter below.”

Mrs. Daniel married Clifton Daniel, the former managing editor of The New York Times, in 1956. He died in 2000.

The author of 23 novels, Mrs. Daniel also wrote nine books of non-fiction that include a biography of her mother, Bess W. Truman. After her father’s death in 1972, she worked as an advocate for presidential libraries.

In addition to her son, she is survived by two other sons, Harrison Gates and Thomas Washington; and five grandchildren.

Another son, William Wallace Daniel, was killed in September 2000 when he was hit by a cab in New York City.

A public memorial is being planned at the Truman Library and Museum in Independence.

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Mime legend Marcel Marceau dies

Sun September 23, 2007
Source: CNN.com-Entertainment

Story Highlights

  • Marcel Marceau has died at the age of 84, French media report
  • Marceau revived art of mime; performed for more than 50 years
  • French Jew survived Holocaust; worked with Resistance to save Jewish children
  • PARIS, France (AP) — Marcel Marceau, who revived the art of mime and brought poetry to silence, has died, his former assistant said Sunday. He was 84. Marceau died Saturday in Paris, French media reported. Former assistant Emmanuel Vacca announced the death on France-Info radio, but gave no details about the cause.Wearing white face paint, soft shoes and a battered hat topped with a red flower, Marceau, notably through his famed personnage Bip, played the entire range of human emotions onstage for more than 50 years, never uttering a word. Offstage, however, he was famously chatty. “Never get a mime talking. He won’t stop,” he once said.

    A French Jew, Marceau survived the Holocaust — and also worked with the French Resistance to protect Jewish children.

    His biggest inspiration was Charlie Chaplin. Marceau, in turn, inspired countless young performers — Michael Jackson borrowed his famous “moonwalk” from a Marceau sketch, “Walking Against the Wind.”

    Marceau performed tirelessly around the world until late in life, never losing his agility, never going out of style. In one of his most poignant and philosophical acts, “Youth, Maturity, Old Age, Death,” he wordlessly showed the passing of an entire life in just minutes.

    “Do not the most moving moments of our lives find us without words?” he once said.

    Prime Minister Francois Fillon praised Marceau as “the master,” saying he had the rare gift of “being able to communicate with each and everyone beyond the barriers of language.”

    Marceau was born Marcel Mangel on March 22, 1923, in Strasbourg, France. His father Charles, a butcher who sang baritone, introduced his son to the world of music and theater at an early age. The boy adored the silent film stars of the era: Chaplin and Buster Keaton, and he also was a fan of the Marx brothers.

    When the Germans marched into eastern France, he and his family were given just hours to pack their bags. He fled to southwest France and changed his last name to Marceau to hide his Jewish origins.   [Full Story]