NFL Suspends Michael Vick Indefinitely, Without Pay

Friday, August 24, 2007

Fox News – No matter how nuanced his confession for involvement in dogfighting, Michael Vick got no leniency Friday from the NFL.Commissioner Roger Goodell suspended the Atlanta Falcons quarterback indefinitely without pay, just hours after Vick filed a plea agreement that portrayed him as less involved than three co-defendants and guilty mainly of poor judgment for associating with them.

Vick acknowledged bankrolling gambling on the dogfights, but denied placing bets himself or taking any of the winnings. He admitted that dogs not worthy of the pit were killed “as a result of the collective efforts” of himself and two co-defendants.

Click here to read Vick’s plea agreement.

Goodell wasn’t moved and didn’t bother to wait until Monday, when U.S. District Judge Henry E. Hudson will formally accept the plea and set a sentencing date likely to land Vick in prison for one to five years.

The commissioner said Vick’s admitted conduct was “not only illegal but also cruel and reprehensible.” Even if he didn’t personally place bets, Goodell said, “your actions in funding the betting and your association with illegal gambling both violate the terms of your NFL player contract and expose you to corrupting influences in derogation of one of the most fundamental responsibilities of an NFL player.”

“Vick did not gamble by placing side bets on any of the fights. Vick did not receive any of the proceeds of the purses that were won by Bad Newz Kennels,” the court document said.

According to the statement, Vick also was involved with the others in killing six to eight dogs that did not perform well in testing sessions last April. The dogs were executed by drowning or hanging.

“Vick agrees and stipulates that these dogs all died as a result of the collective efforts” of Vick, Phillips and Peace, the statement said.

The above is an excerpt taken from the full story which you can follow  here

 

Michael Vick’s Co-Defendant Pleads Guilty in Dogfighting Case

RICHMOND, Va.  As expected, this morning Tony Taylor, a co-defendant in the Michael Vick’s dogfighting case, pleaded guilty to 2 charges. 1) conspiracy to travel in interstate commerce in aid of unlawful activities, and 2) conspiring to sponsor a dog in an animal fighting venture. [Full Story]

[In my own words…Apparently this gives him the right to not having his sentence increased regardless of his testimony during the trial but does not assure him of no sentence at all.  He has not been granted or promised no prison term at all so he had nothing to lose by pleading guilty. 

Some are saying he has “flipped on Vick” or “his homies sellout” and now the NAACP gets involved.  Is this really a race issue?  The charges are about committing a crime and does not speak to a specific race. 

I believe innocent until proven guilty but there is NO WAY this a race issue but a case about “etreme animal abuse”.   flagranny2]

Michael Vick Update: Co-defendant doesn’t want trial

Saturday, July 28, 2007
  

I’m thinking that maybe prison alone might be too lenient.  Why not let the animals have their day and make it a law that anyone charged and convicted of cruelty to animals that part of their sentence mandates they are to spend X amount of time alone in a prison courtyard with X number of prison/police dogs that have been trained to attack. 

The amount of time and the number of dogs would be left to the courts to be based on the nature of the crime and maybe with the help of Animal Rights orgnizations. 

Of course we know this is not even a reality but somehow it would be nice if the animals could have their say in court.  It is beyond me to think that anyone could treat any animal with such cruelty let alone call it a sport.

Taylor to have plea agreement hearing on Monday

RICHMOND, Va. —  One of Michael Vick‘s co-defendants doesn’t want to wait for trial.

Tony Taylor, a witness in the case and facing charges of “conspiracy to travel in interstate commerce in aid of unlawful activities (“Travel Act”)”, and to “sponsor a dog in an animal fighting venture, in violation of federal law.”  

If convicted on the Travel Act portion of the conspiracy charge, Taylor, and each defendant, face a statutory maximum of five years in prison, a $250,000 fine, and full restitution. If convicted on the animal fighting venture portion of the conspiracy charge, each defendant faces one year in prison, a $100,000 fine, or both.

Taylor is expected to make a plea agreement at his hearing Monday morning. 

Other links related to the indictment here

Read full text of the federal indictment