20 Medical Myths

Interesting Medical Myths

See how many you get right,check your answers below.

  1. We only use 10 percent of our brains?

  2. Drinking hot coffee will help sober you up after drinking alcohol?

  3. The drowsiness some people experience may be from the warmth of the milk

     on a full stomach?

  4. Eating too many carrots will turn your skin orange?

  5. Spinach is a good source of iron?

  6. Eating honey reduces seasonal allergy symptoms?

  7. Staring at the sun can cause blindness?

  8. Using Aloe Vera helps your sunburn?

  9. Drinking 8 glasses of water a day is good for your health?

10. Sucking the thumb as a child will give you buck teeth?

11. Your heart stops for an instant when you sneeze?

12. Shaving hair causese it to grow back faster, darker and coarser?

13. Reading in dim light hurts your eyesight?

14. You will catch a cold if you go to bed with wet hair?

15. A flu shot will give you the flu?

16. Eating chocolate causes acne?

17. Eating stuffing from the turkey will cause salmonella poisoning?

18. Placing a wet tea bag or cucumber on your eyes helps reduce wrinkles?

19. You should wait at least 30 minutes after eating before swimming?

20. Your hair and fingernails continue to grow after you die?

ANSWERS

  1. False: People without a neurological condition use almost all of their brain, according to the University of Arkansas for Medical Science.  And the brain is always active and involved in all of the conscious and unconscious activities of the body.

  2. False: Coffee cannot reverse the effects of alcohol.

  3. False: Warm milk may help one relax but no evidence of making one sleepy.

  4. True: Eating too much of food that is high in beta[carotene can cause a     yellowish discoloration of the skin, according to the Dermatology Clinic at    UAMS.

  5. False: Spinach is not particularly rich in iron.

  6. False: Honey doesn’t prevent any problems with seasonal allergies. In theory it honey is purely thought of as anecdotal especially among homeopathic and non-scientific publications.

  7. True: According to ophthalmologists the sun emits solar radiation which damages the retina.

  8. True: Research has shown that the aloe vera plant does aid in healing mild burns and sunburns.

  9. False: Water is definitely good for one’s health but there is no definite amount but it is the key in reducing kidney stones.

10. True and False: Normally does not cause a problem for young children however if continued beyond the age of 5 when permanent teeth begin to come in it may affect the shape of the palate by changing the relationship between upper and lower jaws.

11. False: Sneezing changes the regular heart beat momentarily to adjust but the heart doesn’t stop.

12. False: Shaving doesn’t effect the part of the hair shaft below the skin which is where color and pigmentation occur.

13. False: Neither dim or bright light changes the health or function of your eyes.

14. False: No medical evidence shows that going to bed with wet hair can cause a cold.

15. False: You can not get the flu from either the flu shot or the nasal-vaccine.

16. False: No definitive evidence has been linked to chocolate or any foods causing acne.

17. False: As long as everything is prepared properly. Salmonella bacteria is killed by cooking foods at a high temperatures.

18. True: Cucumbers and tea bags contain some botanical elements which can temporarily reduce wrinkles but which ones work not known.

19. False: The theory that eating increases the blood flow to the stomach and intestines to absorb nutrients therefore less blood to deliver oxygen to remove waste products from the exercising muscles. Truth is the body has enough oxygen to supply the stomach and muscles.

20. False: Hair and nails appear to grow longer because skin around them retracts.

Were you able to get all correct?

£1m to find Loch Ness monster

If you haven’t made vacation plans yet, go ahead and make them for next weekend to attend the Rock Ness Musical Festival where you could possibly be 1 of 50,000 to receive a camera to try and capture a picture that will best the latest one 🙂

Guardian Unlimited

Press Association
Saturday June 2, 2007 12:18 PM

A £1 million reward has been offered to anyone who can find conclusive proof that the Loch Ness monster exists.

The bounty is part of plans to supply up to 50,000 people with cameras in order to search for the mythical sea creature at next weekend’s Rock Ness music festival.

Organisers are claiming it will be the largest ever organised attempt to prove the famous monster is real.

Bookmakers William Hill are offering the reward to anyone who finds evidence which persuades the Natural History Museum that Nessie exists.

They are also offering odds of 250/1 that the museum will agree the existence of the creature sometime this year.

William Hill spokesman Rupert Adams said: “We are hoping the £1 million bounty will help to solve one of the great enigmas of modern times.

“This is a great opportunity with such huge crowds on the shores of Loch Ness and it will be fantastic if someone can get a picture with one of the thousands of Nessie-Snappers cameras we are handing out, that can rival the ‘Surgeon’s photograph’, which is still the most recognised despite being taken over 50 years ago.”

The bookmakers are also offering a number of consolation prizes including £1,000 and a free £250 bet for the best photographic evidence real or staged.

To qualify for the reward all evidence must be gathered over the weekend of the two-day music festival and must be submitted to William Hill by Monday June 18.

The festival, at Dores, near Inverness, is on June 9 and 10 and features top bands such as the Manic Street Preachers.

Tourist Says He’s Shot Video of Loch Ness Monster

Here we go with another sighting of “Nessie” the Loch Ness Monster. Tis someone reporting as having captured video footage of what is believed to be a mythical creature living beneath Scotland’s mysterious lake.

Is this the real Loch Ness Monster, you be the judge!!

Friday, June 01, 2007

EDINBURGH, Scotland — The Loch Ness monster is back — and there’s video.

A man has captured what Nessie watchers say is possible footage of the supposed mythical creature beneath Scotland’s most mysterious lake.

“I couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw this jet-black thing, about 45 feet long, moving fairly fast in the water,” said Gordon Holmes, the 55-year-old lab technician from Shipley, Yorkshire, who took the video Saturday.

Nessie watcher and marine biologist Adrian Shine viewed the video and hoped to properly analyze it in the coming months.

“I see myself as a skeptical interpreter of what happens in the loch, but I do keep an open mind about these things and there is no doubt this is some of the best footage I have seen,” said Shine, of the Loch Ness 2000 center in Drumnadrochit, on the shores of the lake.

He said the video is particularly useful because Holmes panned back to get the background shore into the shot. That means it was less likely to be a fake and provided geographical bearings allowing one to calculate how big the creature was and how fast it was traveling.

Holmes said whatever it was moved at about 6 mph and kept a fairly straight course.

“My initial thought is it could be a very big eel — they have serpent-like features and they may explain all the sightings in Loch Ness over the years.”

Loch Ness is surrounded by myth. It’s the largest inland body of water in Britain, and at about 750 feet to the bottom, it’s even deeper than the North Sea.

“There are a number of possible explanations to the sightings in the loch. It could be some biological creature, it could just be the waves of the loch or it could some psychological phenomenon in as much as we see what we want to see,” Shine said.

While many sightings can be attributed to a drop of the local whisky, legends of Scottish monsters date back to one of the founders of the Christian church in Scotland, St. Columba, who wrote of them in about 565 A.D.

More recently, there have been more than 4,000 purported Nessie sightings since she was first caught on camera by a surgeon on vacation in the 1930s. [That famous photograph was revealed 60 years later to have been a hoax involving a sculpted head mounted on a toy submarine.]

Since then, the faithful have speculated about it is a completely unknown species, a sturgeon — even though they have not been native to Scotland’s waters for many years — or even a plesiosaur, a long-necked aquatic reptile that went extinct with the dinosaurs.

Real or imagined, Nessie has long been a Scottish emblem. She has been the muse for cuddly toys and immortalized on T-shirts and posters showing her classic three-humped image.

On Thursday, a group of Scottish business owners launched a bid to nominate Loch Ness for World Heritage site status — though they cited its natural beauty, not Nessie.

The Destination Loch Ness consortium must submit the nomination to the British government, which would decide whether to forward it to UNESCO.

The Scottish media is skeptical of Nessie stories but Holmes’ footage is of such good quality that even the normally reticent BBC Scotland aired the video on its main news program Tuesday.